If you’re Instagram obsessed then you may have been aware of the new logo that made its official debut last Wednesday to social media. And unlike the original Polaroid logo, this freshly new update has caused quite a stir for both good and bad. Huffpost Business writes that the new logo lacks “depth, cohesion and resonance as its previous predecessor”, while folks at GQ Magazine stated from a consumers perspective the new logo redesign felt “unwarranted, a bit self-indulgent, and out of touch with customers.” But meet one of the creative forces behind Instagrams update, avid Instagrammer and designer from Denver, Colorado, Mackey Saturday.

His take on the update was to resonate with the community saying

“My hope is that the new design maintains all the excitement and delight that Instagram has had in the beginning, but with an even more polished finish.”

Instagrams new logo represents a simpler camera and the rainbow lives in gradient form. On their blog, Instagram wrote “Our updated look reflects how vibrant and diverse your storytelling has become.” Additionally, the company updated its navigational icons such as the home, search, camera, activity and profile buttons. As some million viewers welcomed the new update with open arms, some were not too hesitant for change and voiced their opinions via Twitter.

One user stated

“The new instagram update is so bad; it could make Twitter relevant again.”

While others have chimed in to call the new logo ugly, vile and annoying, another user went to extreme measures to mock the creativeness stating “He could have done a better job.” All the while, other members of the Facebook owned family have also received nice makeovers; Layout, Boomerang and Hyperlapse also have a new, unified look. Layout and Boomerang icons were updated to represent what the apps help you create, and that’s a collection of photos or mini videos that loops forward and backwards. Still despite the newest updates, Instagram is expected to bring in as much as 3.2 billion in 2016. That’s a lot of revenue.